Anne-Héloïse Dautel
Artist/
Digital artist

Anne-Héloïse Dautel

Digital artist

Bio

Anne-Héloïse Dautel is a London-based registered architect, new media and visual artist-researcher. Her interactive art installations have been exhibited internationally. In London, at the Barbican (Prototypes in Public during AI: More than Human, August 2019), the Ugly Duck Gallery (Anamorphic Waves, April 2019), and Grow Hackney (Sense #5 Experiencing Colour, May 2019). Her works have also been on show at Ars Electronica in Linz, Austria (Out of the box, September 2019) and at Istanbul Airport (Genetic Code of Turkish Design Exhibition December 2019-May 2020). Her ongoing research is centred around the role of wonder within aesthetic, perceptual and interactive experiences, tied to both physical and digital environments. Influenced by Oscar Fischinger’s optical poems, John Whitney’s experiments in motion graphics and Zach Lieberman’s coded interactive animations, her research and artwork investigate vision and perception under the conditions of a shifting technological culture. She produces creative coding, computer-mediated graphics and architectural installations aiming to allow room for wonder and accommodate analogue phenomena while maintaining its relevancy in our digital era. Working at the intersection of computer-generated graphics, architecture, robotics, creative coding and technology, she explores the human and machinic sensorium.

After having contracted Covid-19 in 2020, Anne-Héloïse has been having neurological and cognitive complications including losing her sense of touch, smell and taste, due to the virus severely damaging her olfactory nerves and neurons. During her stay at the neurology and neuropsychology department of the CHU hospital of Brittany, she has used art therapy to stimulate her cognitive functions, memory and attention but also as a way to communicate her emotions and distorted olfactory experiences. Her most recent visuals gather and celebrate perceptual moments of nostalgia, illustrating her olfactory disorder called parosmia, or some childhood sensorial and synesthetic memories.

Artworks