Kate Rossini
Artist/
Painter

Kate Rossini

Painter

Bio

Kate Rossini is a Londoner and her work is about exploring aspects of her own identity using surrealist techniques to access the subconscious mind - looking inwards to mine what is hidden - exploring the juxtaposition between methodologies that impose rules & elements of chance in creating work and those freed from rational control. She is not fixed to one theme on genre - her work is a journey of exploration – looking for unexpected connections and meaning through the act of making. Spontaneity, allowing work to emerge from the process of doing, responding and letting go gives her creative permission to be bolder and more experimental.

Travel has had a profound impact on her work - how colours are used differently in different cultures, how the figure is conveyed or attitudes towards identity (particularly the feminine), temple/devotional art, use of perspectives, the art of propaganda etc. She is also passionate about ancient history and mythology seeking out opportunities to visit archaeological sites, seeing antiquities of ancient civilizations and those of the earliest prehistoric societies – is not only humbling but gives inspiration for future projects.

Themes running through her work include: otherness, the feminine & totemic, the mask as a metaphor for identity, emblems, symbols and underlying meaning/subversion and optical effects. She often works in repetition for its meditative and spiritual quality, using music as inspiration – a soundtrack of nostalgia & personal colour combinations that speak to her identity and interpretation of the world. Her work is centred around her own story, personal mythology and childhood memories drawing from memories of her youth in the 1980's with its music scene, neons, bold colours and minimalism - underlined by an anything goes - DIY - "can do" attitude.
The significance and modesty of materials features in Kate’s work - most recently the use of domestic paint & building supplies - as are the use of found objects, reimagining existing work, repurposing objects with a new life or ‘identity’ and using recyclable/sustainable resources (such as aluminium).

Artworks